History of the Yazidi (Abstract)

The official origin of the Yazidis is still unclear because there are no written documents therefore there are a few ideas from different scholars as well as different Yazidi communities across the Iraqi region as to when/how they came to be. However, the Yazidis originated in Syria, in the vicinity of Basra, and later migrated into the Sinjar region of Iraqi Kurdistan, where they adopted the Kurdish language (Cherchi, “Yezidis”). The religion, Yazidism, is believed to have been founded by Shaikh Adi Musafir (pronounced sheik-adi) in the 12th century.

It wasn’t fully recognized as a separate religion from Islam until the fifteenth century. According to themselves, they claim that they are the oldest religion in the world, tracing their religious calendar back 6,756 years. As the sands of time flowed steadily, Yazidi power declined while more and more people converted to Islam.

Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century, many Yazidis ended up fleeing to Georgia and Armenia while in the second half of the twentieth century, most of Turkey’s Yazidis, who still lived in fear of religious persecution, emigrated to Germany. While in the 1990s, many of Iraq’s Yazidi geniuses arrived in Germany, where they play an active position in refugee affairs and retaining contact with co-religionists in Iraq and the Caucasus.

Works Cited

Cherchi, Marcello; Platz, Stephanie; Tuite, Kevin, John Bowker, and “Yezidis.” Encyclopedia of Occultism;Parapsychology. 2001. “Yezidis.”Encyclopedia.com. HighBeam Research, 01 Jan. 1996. Web. 19 Apr. 2016.

The Yezidis originated in Syria, in the vicinity of Basra, and later migrated into the Sinjar region of Iraqi Kurdistan, where they adopted the Kurdish language.  The Yezidis are often referred to as “devil worshipers” by their Muslim and Christian neighbors. The Yezidis are a Kurdish-speaking people practicing a distinctive religion, neither Christian nor Muslim. Some assimilated urban Yezidis have married Armenians. This article is a great source of information to use for this paper because it tells me everything I need to know to help me with writing it.

 

Guest, John S. The Yezidis: A Study in Survival. London: KPI, 1987. Print.

Kreyenbroek, Philip G. Yezidism in Europe: Different Generations Speak about Their Religion. Verlag: Otto Harrassowitz, 2009. Google Books. Google. Web. 21 Apr. 2016. <https://books.google.com/books?id=E4FpDDbrvqkC&pg=PA235&lpg=PA235&dq=Yezidism-+its+Background,+Observances+and+Textual+Tradition+by+Philip+G.+Kreyenbroek+1995&source=bl&ots=t6aNh3I_Pw&sig=aetpp5VJvSBe-g5Tm-viZOoVnAM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjohYuOmaDMAhWEaD4KHf_iCLQQ6AEIRzAJ#v=onepage&q=Yezidism- its Background, Observances and Textual Tradition by Philip G. Kreyenbroek 1995&f=false>.

 

Moosa, Matti. Journal of the American Oriental Society 109.3 (1989): 447–448. JSTOL. Web.

This review is about the book, The Yezidis: A Study in Survival by John S. Guest. It shows someone else’s take/perspective on what the author is trying to say and talk about. This revie is a great source of information to use for this paper because it shows/tells me about someone else’s take on the book and the information in it.

 

Acikyildiz, Birgui. The Yezidis: The History of a Community, Culture, and Religion. 30 Sep 2010. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 19 April 2016.

This book is interesting and informational about the Yezidi religion, society and material culture. However, I focused on just the history and origin of the religion. This article is a great source of information to use for this paper because it tells me everything I need to know to help me with writing it.

 

“The Yezidis.” YezidiTruthorg The Yezidis Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. <http://www.yeziditruth.org/the_yezidis>.

“Yazidi.” Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Ed. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica, 15 May 2015. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. <http://www.britannica.com/topic/Yazidi>.

The Yazidis are a well-organized society. The origins of the Yazidi faith can be traced to areas of the Kurdish mountains of northern Iraq. The geographic spread and political power of the Yazidis continued to increase in the 13th and 14th centuries, while their belief system continued to develop away from Islamic norms. The Yazidi belief system is highly concerned with religious purity, and so Yazidis follow a multiplicity of taboos governing aspects of daily life. This article is a great source of information to use for this paper because it tells me everything I need to know to help me with writing it.

 

“YAZIDIS I. GENERAL.” Encyclopedia Iraninca. Ed. Ehsan Yarshater. Encyclopedia Iraninca, n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. <http://www.iranicaonline.org/articles/yazidis-i-general-1>.

“Yezidi Genocide.” YezidiTruthorg Yezidi Genocide Comments. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. <http://www.yeziditruth.org/yezidi_genocide>.

2 thoughts on “History of the Yazidi (Abstract)

  1. Anna Josti

    In my assignment I looked at the janissaries within the Ottoman empire. They are an enslaved army that the Sultan used as his protective court of arms. They were Christian boys who were taken from their homes and given an elevated status among others in society. Being a janissary was seen as an a vital aspect of the empire. I think that both our topics have similarities between the multicultural aspect of countries and how the person or government in charge gets to determine how people assimilate or if they are a recognized part of society. It’s unfortunate that the government did not allow for the practices of the Yazidi people to occur but I found that even the Ottoman empire who tried to incorporate other cultures into their dominant culture met resistance from un loyal janissaries. This could have been to the fact that they connected more to their own people and culture so they felt no allegiance to the Sultan. The research we collected in our core classes reflect the idea that mixing cultures is a hard thing to do and many empires and governments across the globe have implemented different tactics to manage the differences among people and cultures. I like how the Ottoman empire at least tried to assimilate different cultures rather than just expelling them but it seems that in both cases it is a struggle to protect one’s identity and culture no matter the nation or situation.

    Reply
  2. Brian Cashman

    Similar to my project your groups religion is misrepresented in the world. With the Yazidi not being recognized as their own religion they struggled to gain an identity similarly to the Haitian people. Both of these groups are misrepresented as different groups when in fact they both have their own unique lifestyle and religion. Hopefully both of our projects can bring light to our religious groups.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *